Fire in Australian Savannas

Fire in Australian Savannas

Australian savanna

Australian savanna

eMASTer Bradley Evans was part of an international collaboration that investigated how savanna fires in Australia are coupled to the global climate through the carbon cycle and fire regimes. In the study Beringer and co-workers, currently in press in Global Change Biology and available online, review the understanding of the impact fire has upon biophysical and biogeochemical properties in Australian savannas at multiple scales, from leaf level physiology to regional climate. They focus on biophysics and biogeochemistry rather than ecological drivers since these have already been documented in other articles.

Beringer and co-workers are presenting new indications that climate change likely alters the structure and function of savannas through shifts in moisture availability and increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), and in turn alters fire regimes with further feedbacks to climate. They also explored and present different opportunities to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions from savanna ecosystems through changes in savanna fire management.

 

To read the entire article click here or search for:

J. Beringer, L. B. Hutley, D. Abramson, S. K. Arndt, P. Briggs, M. Bristow, J. G. Canadell, L. A. Cernusak, D. Eamus, B. J. Evans, B. Fest, K. Goergen, S. P. Grover, J. Hacker, V. Haverd, K. Kanniah, S. J. Livesley, A. Lynch, S. Maier, C. Moore, M. Raupach, J. Russell-Smith, S. Scheiter, N. J. Tapper, P. Uotila; 2014. Fire in Australian Savannas: from leaf to landscape. Global Change Biology, in press. DOI:10.1111/gcb.12686

 

 

 

 

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